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Variables and Assumptions in Modern Interpretation of Ancient Spinning Technique and Technology Through Archaeological Experimentation

Tracy P. Hudson (QA)
This paper takes the form of a critical analysis of archaeological experiments using spinning tools. The archaeological experiments regarding whorl weight and wool spinning of the Tools and Textiles – Texts and Contexts project, through the Danish National Research Foundation’s Centre for Textile Research, are examined with respect to a number of variables...

Book Review: The Boyne Currach: From Beneath the Shadows of Newgrange By Claidhbh Ó Gibne

Tom Jackson (IE)

Claidhbh Ó Gibne has devoted himself to building traditional currachs and researching their history. His new volume, The Boyne Currach: From beneath the shadows of Newgrange, puts the currach in the context of the history of...

Book Review: Experimental Archaeology – Between Enlightenment and Experience by Petersson and Narmo

Jodi Reeves Flores (UK)
This book developed from the project Experimental Archaeology – Between Enlightenment and Experience, which was composed of a series of regional meetings held in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. This hardbound publication contains quality illustrations and colour photographs; and the language revision has been done to a solid quality...

Interview with Helmut ‘Hugo’ Windl

Wulf Hein (DE)
Archaeology Starts Just Outside Your Door! Experimental archaeology in Austria carries a name: Hofrat Dr Helmut ‘Hugo’ Windl (born 1944). Windl, has, from the start of his academic career, stood strong for the establishment of this practical form of research in the Alp Republic...

Book Review: Die Knochen- und Geweihgeräte der Feddersen Wierde by Katrin Struckmeyer

Wietske Prummel (NL)
The purpose of this book, which was originally presented as a dissertation at Hamburg University, is to present the 1,293 bone, antler, horn and ivory tools that were found at the terp settlement Feddersen Wierde in the coastal area of Lower Saxony, Germany, and to decide on the possible functions of the tools.

Was it really true, in the Iron Age, men hunted and women cooked the food above a camp fire (NL)?

Surely there was a set division of tasks between men and women, more traditional then nowadays. Probably, inside the house, the women were in charge, men outside. Contrasts were important; air - earth, inside - outside, north - south...

How tall did people get in the early Middle Ages (NL)?

A graveyard from the Merovingian era (470-750) gave an average height for men of 174 cm. Skeletons from a graveyard in Susteren from the Carolingian age (750-900) resulted in an average height of 172.5 cm. According to Statistics Netherlands, Dutch men...

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