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Issue 2016/2

© EXARC, 2016; ISSN: 2212-8956; Publishing date: June 15, 2016

The EXARC Journal consists of Mixed Matters articles, which are open access. We also made open access articles related to the OpenArch project. The other articles are peer-reviewed and for members only (please login at the bottom of the page). 

From June 15th 2017, all articles in this issue are open access.

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Archaeological Open-Air Museum

The Archaeological Open-air Site of the Museum of Prehistory MAMUZ and Its Cultural Touristic Development

Matthias Pacher (AT)
MAMUZ is the new name that combines the Lower Austrian museum of prehistory Niederösterreich Asparn/Zaya and the museum centre Museumszentrum Mistelbach to create a centre of experiences and knowledge covering 40,000 years of the history of the human race. Using the example of its archaeological open-air site, the museum of prehistory MAMUZ aims to show how strategic measures...

The Influence of Spatial Structure on the Economic Value of an Archaeological Park

Andreja Breznik (SI)
This article is a summary of a presentation held at the conference in Mistelbach in 2015, “Archaeological Reconstructions and Tourism”. The conference topic leads us to a more consistent approach to reconstructions and tourism. All who work in the heritage sector know that all types of museums have a great influence on the tourism sector...

Towards a Best Practise of Volunteer Use within Archaeological Open-air Museums: An Overview with Recommendations for Future Sustainability and Growth

Andrew Spencer (UK)
For many archaeological open-air museums (AOAMs), volunteers are an essential and highly visible component of an effective institution. Volunteers bring museums to life with meaningful interpretive contacts, and offer institutions the opportunity to broaden their mission and complete tasks that may not otherwise be possible...

Experimental Archaeology

Getting hammered: The Use of Experimental Archaeology to Interpret Wear on Late Bronze Age Hammers and Modern replicas

E. Giovanna Fregni (UK)
Metalsmithing tools such as hammers are rarely recognised for their significance in understanding prehistoric metalworking technology. Their development and specialisation signal new metalworking techniques and a wider array of the types of metal objects being made. Our knowledge of ancient metalworking is...

Interpretation

A Broken Leg in the Year 1350: Treatment and Prognosis

Wiel van der Mark (NL)
It is the year 1350 in Gravendam (the medieval town of the archaeological open-air museum, (AOAM) Archeon, in the Netherlands). Master Roelof, a wood-and-bone processor, lies unconscious on the stone floor. Shortly before this, he had been climbing the ladder to the attic to grab a log of wood, but it slipped from under him and he ended on the floor...

Spiral Tube Decorations: A Thousand Years of Tradition

Riina Rammo,
Jaana Ratas (EE)
An overview of finds, their regional spread and significance though the ages. The spiral tubes are made of an alloy that consists of copper supplemented mainly with zinc and/or tin (Rammo, Ratas 2015, table 1). The outer diameter of the spiral tubes usually range from 2.5 to 5 mm. Woollen and linen threads as well as horse hairs, were used to join spiral tubes into decorations...
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