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Castrum Corcagiensis - Roman Experimental Archaeology in Ireland

Martin McAree (IE)
Barrack blocks were a central feature in any Roman fort and functioned as the living spaces for a Century and its officers. While Roman forts varied in size from just over an acre for a simple ‘numerius’ fort, to over 55 acers for some large ‘legionary’ forts such as Deva (Chester), the layout of a barrack block was the same...

EXARC visits Moscow

Milica Tapavički-Ilić (RS) and
Artūrs Tomsons (LV)
Between the 1st to the 12th of June 2017, a huge festival called "Times and Epochs" (Времена и эпохи - Cобрание) was organized in Moscow. This was the occassion to gather participants not only from Russia, but also from many other countries, and demonstrate the best of reenactment to festival visitors...

What to blame for the atmosphere change in re-enactment camps? Personal view

Rona Kreekel (NL)
Lately, I have been seeing quite a few posts by friends announcing that they are quitting the Viking Re-enactment hobby. This is sad and worrisome. Apparently, the reasons for leaving are due to a lack of authenticity, show fight, and atmosphere.

Book Review: Representation of the Past in Public Spheres. Experiencing the Past: the Reconstruction and Recreation of History at Colonial Williamsburg by Martine Teunissen

Evelyn Fidler (CA)
When I read the title, I particularly looked forward to reading this book and I was not disappointed. I am glad I was allowed to review it. Colonial Williamsburg has been held up to me as an example to follow when interpreting in living history and open air museums and also criticised when they don’t get it right...

The Movement - Comments on the booklet How to organize a historical event involving reenactment groups

Ingrid Galadriel Aune Nilsen (NO)
I have happily noticed that there is a movement within the re-enactment scene - a move towards discussing re-enactment and living history on a meta-level. In 2014 I published my festival guide How to organize a historical event involving reenactment groups (Aune Nilsen 2014). As a part of an EEA-grants project, we were asked to organize a re-enactment event in Transylvania...

Book Review: Menswear of the Lombards. Reflections in the light of archeology, iconography and written sources

Rena Maguire (UK)
Recent archaeological adventures in the beautiful Friulian region of Northern Italy had introduced me to the history of the Langobards, a Germanic people who settled in the Adriatic during the 6th century AD after a long period of southerly migration from the German/Scandinavian Baltic area...

Living History as an Instrument for Historical and Cultural Exchange in German Archaeological Open-Air Museums: An Online Survey Defines Present Status

Tatjana Meder,
Jana Seipelt and
Sabrina Slanitz (DE)
The topic of Living History is a controversial one, with diverse opinions on its subject matter. To begin with: What does the term Living History mean? And in what context do we discuss it? Living History has long been utilized as a method of experiencing history and cultural exchange in open-air museums, especially outside of Germany...

The VIA SCIPIONIS Project Outdoor Travelling Experimental Archaeology and Re-enactment

J. M. Gallego Cañamero,
E. Ble Gimeno,
P. Valdes Matias and
J. Garcia Perez (ES)
In August 2015 the first rendition of an experimental archaeology project was held, for the first time in Spain. The objective was to study the problems faced by the Roman Republican legions from the second Punic War during their marches. This project, named VIA SCIPIONIS, captured an historical episode from the year 209 BC...

The Attack on the Tooth Worm

Wiel van der Mark (NL)
It is the year 1350 in Gravendam, the medieval town of Archaeological Open-air Museum (AOAM) Archeon in the Netherlands. There is a great deal of commotion on the street when the master cabinetmaker, John, screams out in pain and despair caused by a cavity in one of his molars. The sound of his scream is heard by everyone!...

The Value of Experience: Lessons from a Study of Reenactment

Samantha Hartford (UK)
It is no secret that in many ways experimental archaeology overlaps with what has come to be called experiential archaeology, an interpretive and humanistic approach to the past. As a result of drawing distinct lines between the two, experimental archaeology struggles with its conception of itself, and experiential archaeology is poorly studied.

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