sword

Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) and Reenactment - Concept, Problems, Approaches in Our Experience

Gábor Fábián (HU)
2013 EXARC meeting at Csiki Pihenökert (HU)
***Throughout the history of re-enactment and in general efforts to revive or recreate the milieu of bygone ages, the military aspect of lifestyle has always enjoyed a special status-one might even say that the military stand point is a predominant part of many re-enactments...

Observations on Italian Bronze Age Sword Production: The Archaeological Record and Experimental Archaeology

Luca Pellegrini and
Federico Scacchetti (IT)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***In spite of the very large quantity of Bronze Age swords in Northern Italy, only a few stone moulds have been found. Tests have shown that carving such big stone moulds (more than 60 cm long) requires a large amount of raw material, deep knowledge and skill, rather than a wide set of implements...

A Picenian Warrior Who Lived in the Eight Century BC: A Hypothetical Reconstruction

Mauro Fiorentini (IT)
The Iron Age in Central Italy is a period that begins in the tenth century BC and ends as the Romans take control over other Italic populations. Italy is divided longitudinally by the Apennines and the definition of ‘Central Italy’ includes the actual regions of Lazio and Toscana to the west, Umbria in the middle, Marche and Abruzzo on the east side of the Apennines...

Skansen Archeologiczny Grodzisko w Sopocie (PL)

Member of EXARC
No

The “settlement at Sopot” as theis museum is called shwos visitors the results of research done by the Archaeological Museum in Gdańsk into the world of the early Medieval Pomeranians.

It explains about the history of settlement in Sopot, living conditions and daily activities of its people, old crafts, weapons and contemporary ways of erecting fortifications and houses.

Fotevikens Museum (SE)

Member of EXARC
Yes

25 km south of Malmö, Sweden, you will find the Archaeological Open-Air Museum of Foteviken. Inside a city wall open toward the sea, the world’s only attempt to recreate an entire Viking Age town shows a number of streets with 23 houses and homesteads, reflecting life in a late Viking Age and early Middle Age town in 1134 AD.

25 km south of Malmö, Sweden, you will find the Archaeological Open-Air Museum of Foteviken. Inside a city wall open toward the sea, the world’s only attempt to recreate an entire Viking Age town shows a number of streets with 23 houses and homesteads...