teaching

Experimental Approaches to Student Success

Tim Messner (US)
10th EAC Leiden 2017
***An undergraduate student who hopes to secure meaningful work or pursue graduate studies needs to have excellent grades. This is true for all disciplines, but especially for niche fields like archaeology. Grades alone, however, are rarely enough. Employers and graduate schools seek candidates that are not only ‘book smart’ but who have...

Conference Review: Reconstructive & Experimental Archaeology Conference REARC 2017

Mahala Nyberg (US)
REARC Conferences
***There was something for everyone at the 2017 Reconstructive and Experimental Archaeology Conference, as it represented many aspects of experimental archaeology. The conference took place between the 16th and 19th of November, 2017, at Colonial Williamsburg in Williamsburg, Virginia. Although it was a small conference...

Experimental Archaeology in Latvia: some Possibilities for Future Development

Artūrs Tomsons (LV)

Experimental Archaeology in Latvia, during the past years has acquired a new direction. Although it has a long history of experimental reconstruction, best known for the excavation and rebuilding of the Late Iron Age Latgallian settlement in Āraiši by Dr. Jānis Apals, in last years, after the initiative of the current author...

Recycled Flint Cores as Teaching Tools: Flintknapping at Archaeological Open-Air Museums

Matthew Swieton and
Linda Hurcombe (UK)
This article examines the art and craft of flintknapping and how the OpenArch project has influenced the way in which this specialized body of craft-knowledge can be most efficiently presented to the public, but additionally—and more importantly—how making the most of teaching opportunities can convey a deeper interpretation to the museum-goer...

A Different Look at the Past — a Tour with Objects at the Archaeological Open-Air Museum Oerlinghausen

Sylvia Crumbach (DE)
Due to the inclusion program at schools in North Rhine Westphalia, the need arose to organise guided tours through the museum in such a way that visually impaired participants could be included in the experience. The idea was to offer an additional level of experiencing information through touch, by creating individual purpose-made objects...