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Daily Life and Feasting in the Neolithic: Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of Experience in Experimental Archaeology at the Steinzeitdorf Albersdorf

Tosca Friedrich MA,
Birte Meller MA and
Dr. Rüdiger Kelm (DE)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***During summer 2014, just over 30 students from Archaeological Studies at the University of Hamburg, as well as four children, participated in a practical week of experimental archaeology at the Steinzeitdorf Albersdorf. In preparation for this week, the students attended a seminar at the University of Hamburg...

Knapping Skill Assessment

Bruce Bradley (UK) and
Nada Khreisheh (USA)
OpenArch Dialogue with Skills Issue
***This article is derived from a presentation made by the senior author at the OpenArch Conference "Working with stones in European Pre- and Proto-history in theory and in practice" organised by the Archaeological-Ecological Centre Albersdorf (DE), 23-27 September, 2013.

How Did They Drill That? – A Few Observations on the Possible Methods for Making Large-sized Holes in Antler

Justyna Orłowska (PL)
From the Neolithic period comes a whole range of various kinds of artefacts made of antler (for example axes, hammer-adzes), distinguished by the presence of a large hole (diameter over 2 cm) in their structure. With time, archaeologists started to wonder about possible ways of producing holes of this type...

Book Review: The Emergence of Pressure Blade Making: From Origin to Modern Experimentation by Pierre M. Desrosiers (editor)

Justin Pargeter (ZA)

There are few issues in lithic studies that have captured the imagination and attention of researchers as much as laminar (blade) technologies (see Bar-Yosef & Kuhn 2009). This has resulted in a rich and detailed body of academic work partly reflected in Pierre M. Desrosiers’ (Ed.) The Emergence of Pressure Blade Making: From Origin to Modern Experimentation...

Lithic Experiments in Rescue Archaeology: a Case from Southern Norway

S.V. Nielsen,
J. Åkerstrøm,
T. Vihovde (NO)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***During the fall of 2012, the authors participated in a Stone Age survey conducted in Aust-Agder County where several prehistoric sites were discovered (Eskeland forthcoming). Both shoreline displacement, relative dating of the lithic assemblage and radiocarbon dating of organic material placed the sites in either a Mesolithic or Neolithic context...

Conference: The 2nd Annual Seminar of Experimental Archaeology in Norway

Lotte Eigeland (NO)

Twenty-seven participants gathered at Hringariki museum at Hønefoss in Eastern Norway during a two-day conference from September 1st thru 2nd, 2012...

8th Spanish Experimental Archaeology Workshop

Javier Baena Preysler (ES)
During the penultimate week of September a new Experimental Archaeology Workshop was held in the city of Caspe (Zaragoza, Sain). Organised by several institutions, including the Fundación Fernando El Católico, the City Hall of Caspe, the University of Zaragoza and the Diputación of Aragón, this was the...

Results of a discussion on the state of experimental archaeology in Switzerland

T. Doppler,
S. Osimitz,
K. Schäppi (CH)
On 27 March 2010, the board of the Working Group on Experimental Archaeology in Switzerland (AEAS-GAES) invited a panel of experts to hold a public debate in Olten on whether the incentives that had existed at the time still played their part, how they were now constituted and what the future perspectives were...

Conference: III Congrès internacional d’arqueologia experimental

Sara Graziano (IT)
From 17 - 19 October 2011 in Banyoles, Spain, the third international congress of experimental archeology took place, organized by the Asociacion Experimenta. Banyoles 2011 was a very intense conference, with over 50 speakers in three days, the quality of presentations was particularly high, as well as the presence of young, skilled and passionate researchers...

Book Review: Experimental archaeology presented in the AID Magazine

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)

The top popular magazine in Germany on archaeology is called Archäologie in Deutschland, simply referred to as ‘AiD’. It has been published every two months since 1984 and is 84 pages in length. The publisher is Theiss from Stuttgart. They publish on archaeology, history and ethnography and carry about 650 titles...

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