flint

Basalt Handaxes: Preliminarily Testing the Lithic Translation Strategy Hypothesis and Comparisons with the Fontana Ranuccio Site Bifacial Tools

Giorgio Chelidonio (IT)
11th EAC Trento 2019
***The oldest bifacial “handaxes” known so far belong to the “Kokiselei 4” site, dated to 1.76 Ma (West Turkana, Kenya; Texier, 2018). They have been manufactured by direct lithic percussion on magmatic effusive stone materials. Considering that the evolution of “fully operational intelligence” (Wynn, 1979) has been associated with the so-called...

Early Efforts in Experimental Archaeology: Examples from Evans, Pitt-Rivers, and Abbott

Carolyn Dillian (US)
Experimental archaeology formally began more than 150 years ago with attempts in replicative flint knapping by well-known archaeologists such as Sir John Evans, Augustus (Lane Fox) Pitt-Rivers, John Lubbock, and Sven Nilsson (Coles, 1973). These individuals sought to discover how stone tools were made in order to better identify archaeological artifacts as the products of human manufacture and to understand...

Book Review: Flinthandwerk by Wulf Hein and Marquardt Lund

Philipp Schraut (IT)
The book “Flinthandwerk” is a co-production of two known German experts in experimental archaeology. Both authors have been studying prehistoric techniques for years; Lund has spent his whole lifetime practicing flint-knapping skills during his free time, whilst Hein is the founder of a company that specializes in the reproduction of Stone Age artifacts for museums...

Daily Life and Feasting in the Neolithic: Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of Experience in Experimental Archaeology at the Steinzeitdorf Albersdorf

Tosca Friedrich,
Birte Meller and
Rüdiger Kelm (DE)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***During summer 2014, just over 30 students from Archaeological Studies at the University of Hamburg, as well as four children, participated in a practical week of experimental archaeology at the Steinzeitdorf Albersdorf. In preparation for this week, the students attended a seminar at the University of Hamburg...

Flint

A very hard form of a sedimentary siliceous rock found in chalk and limestone, used as a tool, a weapon or to produce a spark and make fire.

How Did They Drill That? – A Few Observations on the Possible Methods for Making Large-sized Holes in Antler

Justyna Orłowska (PL)
From the Neolithic period comes a whole range of various kinds of artefacts made of antler (for example axes, hammer-adzes), distinguished by the presence of a large hole (diameter over 2 cm) in their structure. With time, archaeologists started to wonder about possible ways of producing holes of this type...

Book Review: The Emergence of Pressure Blade Making: from Origin to Modern Experimentation by Pierre M. Desrosiers (editor)

Justin Pargeter (ZA)

There are few issues in lithic studies that have captured the imagination and attention of researchers as much as laminar (blade) technologies (see Bar-Yosef & Kuhn 2009). This has resulted in a rich and detailed body of academic work partly reflected in Pierre M. Desrosiers’ (Ed.) The Emergence of Pressure Blade Making: From Origin to Modern Experimentation...

Lithic Experiments in Rescue Archaeology: a Case from Southern Norway

S.V. Nielsen,
J. Åkerstrøm and
T. Vihovde (NO)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***During the fall of 2012, the authors participated in a Stone Age survey conducted in Aust-Agder County where several prehistoric sites were discovered (Eskeland forthcoming). Both shoreline displacement, relative dating of the lithic assemblage and radiocarbon dating of organic material placed...