textile

Book Review: A Handbook for Women’s clothing, Northern Europe, 1360-1415 by Ahlqvist and Neijman

Author(s)
Catharina Oksen

The book presents itself as a manual on women’s clothing in Northern Europe through the years 1360-1415, and is aimed at reenactors. The time frame - 1360-1415 - means that we are in the beginning of the Late Medieval period as defined by English and northern European historians (normally set to 1300-1500). The geographical setting is Northern Europe...

Ancient Greek Weaving, Experimental Archeology on Greek Textiles and Household GDP

Author(s)
Richard J. Palmer
Publication Date
#EAC12 World Tour 2021
***This paper outlines the experimental weaving project of an ancient Greek chlamys to investigate the weaving production capacity of a typical household and reconstruct women’s contribution to household GDP in ancient Greece. While some scholars have researched finer textiles and tech-niques based on visual evidence...

Before They Dyed. Mordants and Assists in the Textile Dyeing Process in Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Scandinavian Britain: An Experimental Approach

Author(s)
Katarzyna Stasińska
Publication Date
The experiment aimed to investigate certain aspects of the textile dyeing process in Anglo-Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon Britain: substances known as mordants and assists. This aspect of the dyeing process is often omitted by researchers, who mostly focus on dyestuff as a source of colour. Mordants and assists deserve wider research, however, as they play a great part in the dyeing process...

More Testing of Mesoamerican Lunate Artifacts as Possible Loom Weights, that also Functioned as Twining Tools

Author(s)
Billie J. A. Follensbee
Publication Date
In previous replication studies and experiments, a lunate jade artifact from the Pre-Classic/Formative period (1500 BC-AD 250) of Mesoamerica was analysed, researched, and tested for its similarities to the crescent weight, a specialized type of loom weight found in ancient Central and Southern Europe. These analyses successfully established that even a form of this artifact made of wood, shell, or other...

Bast, Ferns, and Mud: Experimental Recreation of a Kapa Kaha (Barkcloth)

Author(s)
Avalon Paradea
Publication Date
#EAC12 World Tour 2021
***Kapa (Hawaiian barkcloth) was the ubiquitous fabric of historic Hawaiʻi, used for everything from clothing to bedding, from swaddling newborns to enshrouding the deceased, and all things in between. This textile is crafted from the bast (inner bark) of several plant species...

Book Review: Weaving a Realm, Vietnamese clothing from around 1500 AD

Author(s)
Roeland Paardekooper
Publication Date
What a pleasure it was when this book landed on my coffee table! The book is bilingual Vietnamese – English, well designed and covers over 200 pages with hundreds of full-colour images. The book is a joint project by several Vietnamese from around the world who wished to add to the awareness of Vietnamese identities around the world. Viet Nam is so much more than what people remember of the Vietnam War...

A Shared Warp: The Woven Belts of the Lao Han People, China

Author(s)
Celia Elliott-Minty
Publication Date
The remote mountain area of Guizhou in southwest China is ethnically diverse, and interesting textile traditions survive among the groups. Perhaps the best known are the multicoloured costumes of the Miao people that are skilfully decorated with embroidery and braids (Smith, 2007). Another ethnic group are the "Lao Han" (the ancient Han Chinese) who consider themselves unique from the rest of ...

What was *platъ and how Did it Work? Reconstructing a Piece of Slavic Cloth Currency

Author(s)
Jan Kratochvíl
Jakub Koláček
Publication Date
Using a credit theory of money, we propose that at least some Slavic tribal communities underwent a process of social monetization. In order to fully support this hypothesis, however, many linguistic and historiographic sources would need to be discussed – a task which exceeds the scope of a single article. Therefore, we will here focus on examining (from technical perspective) the oldest type of “money”...

The Shroud of Turin and the Extra Sheds of Warping Threads. How Hard can it be to Set up a 3/1 Chevron Twill, Herringbone on a Warp-weighted Loom?

Author(s)
Antoinette Merete Olsen
Publication Date
On the 10 May 2020, Mr. Hugh Farey sent me an email. He introduced himself as “a researcher into the weaving of the linen cloth known as the Shroud of Turin”. Then he described the size of the Shroud and how it looked. His question to me was this: “If you had a piece of cloth as described and looked at it closely, could you tell if it was made by a warp-weighted or treadle loom, or would there be no difference?”...

Testing Mesoamerican Lunate Artifacts as Possible Crescent Loom Weights

Author(s)
Billie J. A. Follensbee
Publication Date
While the importance of textiles in Mesoamerica from the Classic period (AD 250-900) onward is well-recognized, scholars have conducted little exploration of earlier Mesoamerican textile production. This lack of scholarship may be attributed in great part to the scant preservation of perishable textiles and tools from ancient times. New sources of information have been recognized, however...