Teaching Children

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Teaching school children is one of the prime reasons why we have archaeological open-air museums. Many education centres only serve school groups, and are not even open to day visitors. Examples can be found in Denmark, the Netherlands, Italy and Spain. At these centres and open-air museums, a kind of informal learning makes children learn much more than just book-knowledge. They learn that situations can be approached in different ways and there are different ‘correct’ solutions. Informal learning is a welcome addition to school life and reaches more than just the mainstream of each class.

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Taking Archaeological Concepts outside the Social Science Class in Indian Schools

Smriti Haricharan (IN)
In Indian classrooms, social sciences receive disproportionately less attention than natural sciences and mathematics (Dahiya, 2003; Lall and House, 2005; Roy, 2017). History features within the social science textbooks in India, and is perceived as boring and uninteresting by school children (Roy, 2017; Dahiya, 2003); archaeology is taught as part of the history lessons and is most often not seen as...

Beyond School - Workshops in Experimental Archaeology at the Museum (Romania)

Vasile Diaconu (RO)
Experimental archaeology, as an educational means, has become a particularly useful practice in museum institutions in Romania, although there is no tradition in this field. Here, we present activities of the History and Ethnography Museum in Târgu Neamţ, where several experimental archaeology workshops were organised for pupils aged between 9 and 12 years. Participants were introduced to the prehistoric technologies...

Vacation in the Past - Effective Heritage Interpretation through Education

Réka Vasszi (HU)
2018 EXARC in Kernave
***Heritage sites are breathing memories from the past; however, visitors can hardly imagine or experience the ancient life on the spot. In fact, these visits are supposed to conjure up journeys back into the past and park managers should facilitate such experiences by the most effective means possible in order to help tourists gain...

Summer Camp for Experimental Archaeology in the Eindhoven Museum (NL)

Lasse van den Dikkenberg (NL)
Every year the Dutch Youth Association for History (NJBG) organizes several summer camps for children and young adults. Since the Eindhoven Museum was founded in 1982 the Workgroup for Experimental Archaeology (WEA) has organised activities in the museum which are concerned with experimental archaeology.

Museum Theatre in Greece: Perspectives in Site Interpretation

Foteini Venieri and
Nikonanou Niki (GR)
The paper summarizes preliminary findings of a research project on the use of museum theatre in Greek open-air sites, as a part of a PhD thesis. The research focuses on the exploration of the development, use and function of museum theatre in Greek open-air sites based on available secondary resources and primary research, which...

“You could See it [the Past] in your Mind”: What Impact might Living History Performance Have on the Historical Consciousness of Young People?

Ceri Jones (UK)
2012 OpenArch meeting at Foteviken (SE)
***Living history is used as part of a range of interpretive techniques to help young people experience and learn about the past at museums and historic sites (Samuel 1994). Although the benefits of bringing the past to life have been enthusiastically supported by costumed interpreters, museum and...

A Playground Amongst Museums - The Bauspielplatz: from an Open-air Youth Centre to a History Experience Site - an Unusual Development

Frank Kock (DE)
Being a Bauspielplatz [adventure playground] usually means that children have a place to meet, play, be creative, get in contact with animals and nature and even do ‘dangerous’ things - with some pedagogical guidance. It is part of local social work, similar to a youth centre...

Public Outreach in the Drents Museum in Assen (NL)

Blue van der Zwan-Deen (NL)
Part of my job as museum teacher at the Drents Museum in Assen is attending to the all the groups that visit our museum. This includes the great number of children, both elementary school and high school students, that visit our museum. A lot of children think of a museum as a boring place where there is nothing to do but look at old paintings...