Adult Education

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Archaeology and adult education are a good pair. This does not include only the training of archaeology students – as archaeology deals with many aspects of the past, teaching about these aspects is relevant to any adult public, showing how people dealt with situations in the past which are relevant to today. Many problem solving techniques can be learned in a classroom constellation, but even better in reconstructive archaeology, in the open air. The articles in this section show some examples.

Featured

Taking Archaeological Concepts outside the Social Science Class in Indian Schools

Smriti Haricharan (IN)
In Indian classrooms, social sciences receive disproportionately less attention than natural sciences and mathematics (Dahiya, 2003; Lall and House, 2005; Roy, 2017). History features within the social science textbooks in India, and is perceived as boring and uninteresting by school children (Roy, 2017; Dahiya, 2003); archaeology is taught as part of the history lessons and is most often not seen as...

Experimental Archaeology in the Scottish Highlands

Susan Kruse (UK)
Over the past year, Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands (ARCH) has been running a series of experimental archaeology workshops in the Scottish Highlands. ARCH is a non-profit educational charity, providing learning opportunities inside and out for all ages, always with an eye on the legacy of the event. Our experimental archaeology project was a good example of this approach...

The Construction of a Skin-on-Frame Coracle at Kierikki Stone Age Centre

Peter Groom,
India McDermott and
Evon Kirby (UK)
In July 2018 a group of students from the UK participating in the Placements in Environmental, Archaeological and Traditional Skills (PEATS) Erasmus + Work Placement, attended the Kierikki Stone Age Centre, Pahkalantie, Finland. During the week previous to this experiment, the same group of students had built a skin-on-frame canoe, so the decision was taken to build an alternative lightweight craft...

The Construction of a Skin-on-Frame Canoe at Kierikki Stone Age Centre, Finland, as a Medium for Group Training in Ancient Skills and Experiential Learning

Peter Groom,
Patrick Sweeney and
James Findlay (UK)
In July 2018 a group of students from the UK participating in the Placements in Environmental, Archaeological and Traditional Skills (PEATS) Erasmus + Work Placement, attended the Kierikki Stone Age Centre, Pahkalantie, Finland. Part of that training included experimental / experiential projects that were coordinated by Dr. Peter Groom of the Mesolithic Resource Group...

Butser Ancient Farm: An Internship Full of Senses

Àngels Fernández Canals (ES)
‘What is experimental archaeology?’ people asked me. ‘But if you work within an experimental place, you won’t be able to put into practise the tools learned in your Masters about cultural heritage and museology’ said some of my classmates. However, for me it was really important to do my internship in a place where the archaeology was paramount; at the same time, I was interested in...

Public Access to (Pre-)History Through Archaeology

Katie Stringer Clary (US)
Public history, like experimental archaeology, is relatively new as an accepted academic program; the two fields are intrinsically linked and should, ideally, use interdisciplinary collaboration to better educate and involve the public in their work. This paper presents case studies in education and interpretation by the author, as well as exemplary programs from various sites in the United States and Europe...

Experimental Approaches to Student Success

Tim Messner (US)
10th EAC Leiden 2017
***An undergraduate student who hopes to secure meaningful work or pursue graduate studies needs to have excellent grades. This is true for all disciplines, but especially for niche fields like archaeology. Grades alone, however, are rarely enough. Employers and graduate schools seek candidates that are not only ‘book smart’ but who have...

An Insight into the Baltic Experimental Archaeology Summer School 2017

Artūrs Tomsons (LV)
The Baltic Experimental Archaeology Summer School (BEASS) took place from July 17th to 23rd 2017 in Lucavsala, Riga, Latvia. For the first time it was organised outside Āraiši Archaeological museum park, because of the change of its status from a branch of the National History Museum back to the department of Amata local municipality near Cēsis...

Twenty Years with Flint. The Society for Experimental Prehistoric Archaeology – Where are We Now?

Grzegorz Osipowicz and
Justyna Kuriga (PL)
The Society of Experimental Prehistoric Archaeology (SEPA, www.keap.umk.pl) is an organisation affiliated with the Nicolaus Copernicus University’s Institute of Archaeology since 1998. The first academic supervisor of SEPA was Jolanta Małecka-Kukawka, now led by Grzegorz Osipowicz...

Broken Rocks, Fired Clay and Soured Milk – A Summer of Experiments with the Bamburgh Research Project at the Bradford Kaims Site

R. Brummet,
R. Brewer and
R. Moss (UK)
The Bamburgh Research Project operates an archaeological field school every summer in Northumberland, England. We have two sites: one located at seaside Bamburgh Castle and the other a few miles away inland at the Bradford Kaims. The Bradford Kaims is located on the edge of a wetland and has shown evidence for prehistoric seasonal human occupation...

Experimental Archaeology in Latvia: some Possibilities for Future Development

Artūrs Tomsons (LV)

Experimental Archaeology in Latvia, during the past years has acquired a new direction. Although it has a long history of experimental reconstruction, best known for the excavation and rebuilding of the Late Iron Age Latgallian settlement in Āraiši by Dr. Jānis Apals, in last years, after the initiative of the current author...

A Course in Experiential Archaeology at an Archeopark as a Part of Active University Education

V. Mikešová and
D. Maršálek (CZ)
As with any other science, archaeology constantly adopts new methods and trends over time. University education in the field can be very helpful advancing sciences in every country. This type of education influences the early stages of future top scientists and forms their future careers. Therefore, education should reflect not only scientific innovations but also innovative educational methods...

I Know What you Did Last Summer

Bill Schindler (US)
It was during a field trip to the National Archives with a group of college students that I first became aware of the problem. We had traveled to Washington D.C. to view the exhibit titled, What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam? The Government’s Effect on the American Diet. It was on our way home when I posed this simple question to the students, “What are your reactions to the exhibit?”...

Let’s Build a Medieval Tile Kiln - Introducing Experimental Archaeology into the University Curriculum

Gaynor Wood (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***As a lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) I teach a course on medieval archaeology and run a successful programme in designing exhibitions for local museums and community groups. I also encourage my students to take part in the community archaeology and history projects...

International Learning Partnership: Living History and Adult Education in the Museum

Susanne Wiermann (DE)
Many archaeological open-air museums and museums with indoor reconstructions choose to interpret history using the method of ‘living history’, or re-enactments. If one only counts the German references, there is wide variety of terms used by museums when they talk of ‘living history’...

Grundtvig, Life Long Learning in Archaeological Open-Air Museums

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)

In November 2009, the idea for launching a network on adult education in EXARC was picked up. The first step was a preparation meeting in Oerlinghausen, Germany where we met with about 20 EXARC members from almost all corners of Europe. By mid 2010, 15 organisations, including EXARC itself joined in two so called Grundtvig Learning Partnerships, funded by the European Union...

WEA’s Latest Life Experiment

Jaco Schilp (NL)

The WEA, Society for Experimental Archaeology, is a sub-society of the NJBG, the Dutch Historical Youth Association. It is formed by youngsters aged 12 to 26 who enjoy participating in several aspects of living history. WEA offers them a chance to learn about history, set up their own archaeological experiments, and the opportunity to participate in living history for example by learning a...