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Issue 2017/4

© EXARC, 2017; ISSN: 2212-8956; Publishing date: November 20, 2017

The EXARC Journal consists of  Peer-Reviewed and Mixed Matters articles. From June 15th 2017 all articles (new and old) are open access.

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Archaeological Open-Air Museum

Castrum Corcagiensis - Roman Experimental Archaeology in Ireland

Martin McAree (IE)
Barrack blocks were a central feature in any Roman fort and functioned as the living spaces for a Century and its officers. While Roman forts varied in size from just over an acre for a simple ‘numerius’ fort, to over 55 acers for some large ‘legionary’ forts such as Deva (Chester), the layout of a barrack block was the same...

Experimental Archaeology

The Mechanics of Splitting Wood and the Design of Neolithic Woodworking Tools

A. R. Ennos and
J. A. Ventura Oliveira (UK)
Because of the anisotropy of wood, trunks and branches can be vulnerable to splitting along the grain, especially radially. This fact was widely exploited in pre-industrial times, when wood was mostly cut and shaped by splitting it along the grain while still green, rather than by sawing...

Now we’re Cooking with Gas! How experimental archaeology challenges modern assumptions about metal recycling

E. Giovanna Fregni (IT)
It is accepted knowledge that when re-melting alloys, some of the metal with a lower melting temperature is lost through oxidation, and more metal must be added in order to maintain the desired alloy proportions. In order to understand the changes in alloy content when recycling using Bronze Age technology, experiments were undertaken by the author and others...

Kicking Ash, Viking glass bead making

Neil Peterson (CA)
10th EAC Leiden 2017
***Tens of thousands (Callmer, 1977, pp.12-32) of beads marking the rich graves of the Viking world indicate that the production of these beads is an area worthy of study. Evidence such as mandrels, crucibles, bead fragments, and semi-manufactures exist at Helgo, Birka, Paviken, Hedeby (Lundström, 1976, p.3)...

Interpretation

Experimental Archaeology as Participant Observation: A Perspective from Medieval Food

Scott D. Stull (US)
10th EAC Leiden 2017
***Central to anthropology is the concept of participant observation, where a researcher engages in immersive learning through ethnographic fieldwork. This concept is also important for archaeologists as immersive learning provides an avenue for more robust interpretation and the development of better research questions...
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