Archaeological Open-Air Museum

Steinzeitdorf Kussow (DE)

Member of EXARC
Yes

The Stone Age Village at Kussow exists of several huts and houses with North German excavations of the late Mesolithic and early Neolithic period as source.

There is a model of a long grave, a garden with old types of plants as well as an area with old breeds of animals. Finally, there is an exhibition of copies of Mesolithic and Neolithic tools. The museum runs a program of experimental and experiential archaeology combined with living history. Tourists can do activities such as weaving, pottery, shooting bow and arrow as well as shooting with the atlatl.
School programmes start with a video and a tour through the Stone Age village, following by aforementioned activities.

Sainte-Marie among the Hurons (CA)

Member of EXARC
No

Sainte-Marie among the Hurons was a French Jesuit settlement in Wendake, the land of the Wendat, near modern Midland, Ontario, from 1639 to 1649. It was the first European settlement in Ontario. Sainte-Marie became the Jesuit headquarters in Huronia but when the mission was deserted in 1649, the remaining missionaries burnt it to the ground.

Starting in 1964, Sainte-Marie was reconstructed as a historical site and living museum. All of the buildings and their contents are reproductions. A popular tourist attraction, it draws thousands of visitors each week during the summer months. The site is managed by Huronia Historical Parks, an agency of the Ontario Ministry of Tourism and Culture.

L’Anse aux Meadows (CA)

Member of EXARC
No

At the tip of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula lies the first known evidence of European presence in the Americas. In 1960, George Decker, a citizen of the small fishing hamlet of L'Anse aux Meadows, led Helge Ingstad to a group of mounds near the village that the locals called the "old Indian camp".

Helge Ingstad and Anne Stine Ingstad carried out seven archaeological excavations there from 1961 to 1968. L'Anse aux Meadows is currently the only confirmed Norse site in North America. Eventually it became a federal site and now it is part of the Parks Canada Agency family of National Historic sites, National Parks, and Marine Conservation Areas. It was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1978.

Heritage Park Historical Village (CA)

Member of EXARC
No

Heritage Park Historical Village is a historical park in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. As Canada's largest living history museum, it is one of the city's most visited tourist attractions.

Exhibits span Western Canadian history from the 1860s to the 1950s. You will see Western Canada's iconic past not only preserved, but also presented alive and in great working condition. Many of the buildings are historical and were transported to the park to be placed on display, including the 1913 Little Synagogue on the Prairie from Sibbald, Alberta. Others are re-creations of actual buildings. Most of the structures are furnished and decorated with genuine artefacts. Staff dress in historic costume, and antique automobiles and horse-drawn vehicles service the site.

Fortress Louisbourg (CA)

Member of EXARC
No

The Fortress of Louisbourg is the largest reconstruction project in North America. The original settlement was founded in 1713 by the French and developed over several decades into a thriving center for fishing and trade.

Fortified against the threat of British invasion during the turbulent time of empire-building, Louisbourg was besieged twice before finally being destroyed in the 1760s. Its two sieges, especially that of 1758, were turning points in the Anglo-French struggle for what today is Canada. The site lay untouched until well into modern times, when archaeologists began to reconstruct the fortress as it was in the 18th century.

Fort William Historical Park (CA)

Member of EXARC
No

Fort William Historical Park is a Canadian historical site located in Thunder Bay, Ontario, that contains a reconstruction of the Fort William fur trade post as it existed in 1816. Fort William Historical Park is located on the banks of the Kaministiquia River at Point de Meuron. This point is a few kilometres upstream from the original fort's site, Fort Kaministiquia, which has been built over as part of the city of Thunder Bay.

Numerous historic buildings have been reconstructed to show the range of the post, and costumed historical interpreters recreate Fort William of the year 1816. Fort William was then not primarily a settlement, but a central transport depot within the now-defunct North West Company's network of fur trade outposts. Due to its central role, Fort William was much larger, with more facilities than the average fur trade post. Reflecting this, Fort William Historical Park contains 42 reconstructed buildings, a reconstructed Ojibwa village, and a small farm.

Fort Langley National Historic Site (CA)

Member of EXARC
No

Fort Langley National Historic Site is a former trading post of the Hudson's Bay Company. Founded in 1827, it was well frequented over the years 1856-1886. This was due to its strategic location on the northern boundary of the Oregon Territory of the U.S. and in the path of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush. It played a key role in the establishment of the 49th parallel as the international boundary with the U.S. In 1886, Fort Langley ceased to be a company post.

In 1923, the Canadian government designated Fort Langley as a National Historic Site. At this time, the site consisted only of the one original building, the storehouse, and 1-acre of land. From 1931 to 1956, the Native Sons and Daughters of British Columbia operated a museum out of the storehouse. Parks Canada took control of the site in 1955, and a joint Federal-Provincial program reconstructed three buildings in time for the centennial of the founding of British Columbia in 1958.

Fort Edmonton Park (CA)

Member of EXARC
No

Fort Edmonton Park is a living history museum that focuses on Edmonton’s early years. After the old fort was torn down in 1915, citizens became interested in its history. The Fort Edmonton Foundation started 1969 with the execution of a masterplan with ten Eras. This plan was later amended and we can now see four distinct eras.

The four eras are:
# The Fur Trading Era as represented by the Hudson Bay Company Trading Fort (circa 1846)
# The Settlement Era as depicted on 1885 Street
# The Municipal Era (post railway) brought to life on 1905 Street
# The Metropolitan Era portrayed on 1920 Street and the Johnny J Jones Midway
The replica fort opened in 1974 and finally the 1920 Street was opened in the early 1990s.

Ornavik (FR)

Member of EXARC
No

ORNAVIK is a rather crazy project, aiming to recreate Normandy as it might have been in the 10th and 11th centuries.
Ornavik is also a place where you can discover the history of the birth of our region through its Carolingian village, its Viking area and its Motte and Baily castle. At Ornavik you can not only study Viking history but above all relive it! From the moment you enter into the Park, you will be immersed in a world of craftspeople, warriors, merchants, nobility and other townspeople in their costumes.

A Collaborative Real Life Adventure
Ornavik lives through the dedicated work of about a hundred volunteers and is financed mainly by local ponsors and regional grants. The authenticity of the project is ensured by a panel of experts, made up of historians and archaeologists, who check the building plans and techniques prior to reconstruction.

Kolomenskoye Park (RU)

Member of EXARC
No

Kolomenskoye (Russian: Коло́менское) is a former royal estate situated several kilometers to the southeast of the city center of Moscow, Russia, on the ancient road leading to the town of Kolomna (hence the name). The 390 hectare scenic area overlooks the steep banks of the Moskva River. It became a part of Moscow in the 1960s.

Tsar Alexis I (1629-1676) had all the previous wooden structures in Kolomenskoye demolished and replaced them with a new great wooden palace, famed for its fanciful, fairy-tale roofs. Foreigners referred to this huge maze of intricate corridors and 250 rooms, as 'an Eighth Wonder of the World'. Although basically only a summer palace, it was the favorite residence of Tsar Alexis I. The future Empress Elizabeth Petrovna was born in the palace in 1709, and Tsar Peter the Great spent part of his youth here. Upon the departure of the court for St.