News

AGM concluded - Changes to the EXARC Board

The Annual General Meeting (AGM) ended on 16 May 2022 and the minutes from the meeting can be found here. With the conclusion of the AGM, there have been some changes to the EXARC board.

After six years on the EXARC board, Pascale Barnes (UK) leaves  her position as chair and is replaced by Peter Inker (US). Julia Heeb (DE) and Javier Baena Preysler (ES) have been re-elected to the board. Julia will be acting as vice-chair of the board for the next three years. You can see the current EXARC board here.

We would like to thank Pascale again for her all her work and dedication for EXARC as a board member and chair.

Podcast: Neolithic House & Home

It's the first Friday of the month! And that means it's time to listen in to the latest episode of Finally Friday, which this month focusses on reconstructing houses and daily life in the Late Neolithic. We are joined by two archaeologists from the Putting Life into Late Neolithic Houses project discussing all the methods they’re using to create a picture of the past, from full scale reconstruction to microwear analysis.

Annelou van Gijn is Professor of Archaeological Material Culture and Artefact Studies at Leiden University and the Principal Investigator for Putting Life into Late Neolithic Houses. Diederik Pomstra has over 20 years of experience in experimental archaeology, ancient technology, and public outreach...

EXARC member Giovanna Fregni’s fellowship at Colonial Williamsburg

Dr. Giovanna Fregni's was awareded the Colonial Williamsburg EXARC Fellowship in 2019, however due to the pandemic could only start the fellowship in April this year.

(The fellowship in 2020/2021 was also postponed because of Corona).

Giovanna is an archaeologist and was previously employed as a gem cutter and jewellery designer. Part of her fellowship tasks was to construct a simple lapidary machine to polish and cut gems, using materials and equipment available during the American Colonial period as well as researching "how it would have been done, especially without the use of modern polishing compounds."