You are here

Experimental Archaeology

Fire and Bone: An Experimental Study of Cremation

C. Snoeck,
R. J. Schulting (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***Many bone fragments have been burned in controlled laboratory conditions but few have been burned on outdoor pyres. In order to study and understand cremated bone, it is crucial to conduct experiments in real environmental conditions. In this study several cremations were carried out outdoors using ‘old’ fuels...

Let’s Build a Medieval Tile Kiln - Introducing Experimental Archaeology into the University Curriculum

Gaynor Wood (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***As a lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) I teach a course on medieval archaeology and run a successful programme in designing exhibitions for local museums and community groups. I also encourage my students to take part in the community archaeology and history projects that I run with archaeological and historical local groups in Preston...

Lithic Experiments in Rescue Archaeology: a Case from Southern Norway

S.V. Nielsen,
J. Åkerstrøm,
T. Vihovde (NO)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***During the fall of 2012, the authors participated in a Stone Age survey conducted in Aust-Agder County where several prehistoric sites were discovered (Eskeland forthcoming). Both shoreline displacement, relative dating of the lithic assemblage and radiocarbon dating of organic material placed the sites in either a Mesolithic or Neolithic context...

Experimental Lime Burning Based on the Findings from the Roman Empire Period

Richard Thér,
David Maršálek (CZ)

In 2006 the remains of two lime kilns from the Roman Empire period were discovered in Tuněchody near Chrudim in the Czech Republic. These finds became the object of a detailed multidisciplinary research project resulting in hypotheses on the use of the kilns. Based on these hypotheses experimental research was designed (Thér et al. 2010)...

The Quality of the Craft

Paul Eklöv Pettersson (SE)
In this study the sustainability of crucibles used during the Scandinavian Bronze Age is tested. Due to the crucible’s high or low sustainability the idea of it being a disposable object may be ratified or discarded. Earlier experiments focusing on the casting process in Scandinavian Bronze Age have concluded that crucibles such as the ones used during Bronze Age were disposable objects due to low sustainability...

Technical Elements for Etruscan-Padan Kilns Firing and Female Labour Connected to These Tools

Francesca Caresani (IT)
This article presents work connected to the GestiRitrovati project, the association that performs archaeological experiments at the Forcello Archaeological Park (Mn). The aim is to recover archaic customs of Etruscan-Padan pottery production...

Results of a discussion on the state of experimental archaeology in Switzerland

T. Doppler,
S. Osimitz,
K. Schäppi (CH)
On 27 March 2010, the board of the Working Group on Experimental Archaeology in Switzerland (AEAS-GAES) invited a panel of experts to hold a public debate in Olten on whether the incentives that had existed at the time still played their part, how they were now constituted and what the future perspectives were...

Scandinavian Iron Age and Early Medieval Ceramic Moulds - Lost Wax or Not or Both?

Anders Söderberg (SE)
1999 Wilhelminaoord Workshop
***Since the 1940s we have had a discussion in Scandinavia concerning ancient mould-making methods. The question of different methods in the production of ceramic moulds has taken a large part in these discussions; by lost wax or by direct matrix-methods.

How Metallographic Examinations can Give the Forming Process of Metal Artefacts? The Example of the Hoard Of Farébersviller

Cécile Veber,
Michel Pernot (FR)
1999 Wilhelminaoord Workshop
***The hoard of Farébersviller (Moselle, France) was discovered in 1991 during rescue excavations (See Image above). This set contains 130 "bronze" artifacts, which date to the Late Bronze Age (8th century BC).

Historical Techniques: Cold Gilding

Michiel Langeveld (NL)
1999 Wilhelminaoord Workshop
***An historal technique of goldplating, described in 18th century literature, was reproduced. This cold-plating technique uses salts of gold, produced by dissolving gold in aqua regia. these salts are then rubbed onto a silver surfaces.

Pages

Subscribe to Experimental Archaeology
© by: EXARC since 2001. All rights reserved