Experimental Archaeology

A Gaulish Throwing Stick Discovery in Normandy: Study and Throwing Experimentations

L. Bordes,
A. Lefort and
F. Blondel (FR)
In 2010 archaeological excavations on the pre-Roman site of Urville Nacqueville, Normandy (France) discovered a shaped unknown wooden implement. This boomerang shaped wooden artefact, dated from 120 to 80 BC, has been found in an enclosure trench of a Gaulish village close to a ritual deposit of whalebones...

The Creation of an Experimental Camp of Protohistory at the Iberian Settlement of Estinclells (Verdú, Urgell, Catalonia)

J. Morer De Llorens,
R. Cardona Colell (ES) et al.
The idea to create the Experimental Camp of Protohistory (CEP) emerged in late 2009. It was set up in a field adjacent to the Iberian Culture settlement of Estinclells (Verdú, Urgell), an archaeological site with only one phase of occupation that offers an exceptional portrait of life in the third century BC...

Field Trials in Neolithic Woodworking – (Re)Learning to Use Early Neolithic Stone Adzes

R. Elburg,
W. Hein,
A. Probst and
P. Walter (DE)
OpenArch Dialogue with Skills Issue
***Excavations of several Early Neolithic wells with excellent preservation of the wooden lining in the past years have made clear that Stone Age woodworking already attained a very high level of perfection. This poses the question how it was possible to execute this type of work with the means available at that time...

How Did They Drill That? – A Few Observations on the Possible Methods for Making Large-sized Holes in Antler

Justyna Orłowska (PL)
From the Neolithic period comes a whole range of various kinds of artefacts made of antler (for example axes, hammer-adzes), distinguished by the presence of a large hole (diameter over 2 cm) in their structure. With time, archaeologists started to wonder about possible ways of producing holes of this type...

Two Reconstructions of Prehistoric Houses from Torun (Poland)

G. Osipowicz,
D. Nowak and
J. Kuriga (PL)
In 1998 the Society for Experimental Primeval Archaeology (SEPA) was founded at the Institute of Archaeology at the Nicolaus Copernicus University (NCU) in Toruń. Since its beginnings, SEPA members have dedicated a great effort to engaging in numerous scientific experiments with the aim to present human lifestyle in prehistoric times in general...

Get into the Grave: Notions of Community Social Identity in a Late 3rd Millennium Site, Derived from an Experimental Carving of a Shaft Tomb at Ramat Bet Shemesh (Israel)

Y. Tsur,
N. Kahalani,
Y. Paz and
R. Nickelberg (IL)
Khirbet el-Alia is a large mound, located north-east of Tel Yarmouth, in the Ramat Bet Shemesh region of Israel. An excavation that was conducted north of the mound revealed the remains of a settlement and an adjacent cemetery of shaft graves, dating back to the Intermediate Bronze Age (IBA)...

The Iron Age Iberian Experimental Pottery Kiln of Verdú, Catalonia, Spain

R. Cardona Colell,
J. Pou Vallès,
N. Calduch Cobos,
B. Gil Limón,
J. M. Gallego Cañamero and
L. Castillo Cerezuela (ES)
The goal of this project is to reconstruct the operational sequence of manufacture of Iberian Iron Age pottery, from clay procurement to firing in a reconstructed kiln. Although pottery is the most characteristic artefact recovered on Iberian Iron Age excavations, most of its complex processes and production techniques remain poorly known...

An Experimental Comparison of Impressions Made from Replicated Neolithic Linen and Bronze Age Woolen Textiles on Pottery

Lauren Ferrero (UK)
Textile impressions on pottery provide evidence for fabrics and weaves in areas where the fabrics themselves do not survive. This article argues that the impressions can provide information on the uses of different fibres, the weaving technologies and possible trading or agricultural advances connected with these fibres...