You are here

Welcome

One of EXARCs most important assets is the EXARC JOURNAL, all open access. It has four peer-reviewed sections covering EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGICAL OPEN-AIR MUSEUM, ANCIENT TECHNOLOGY and INTERPRETATION.
The fifth section of the EXARC Journal is called MIXED MATTERS. It contains book reviews, reports from conferences and events, interviews with personalities from the world of experimental archaeology and portraits of archaeological open-air museums. This section will be regularly updated to bring you topical news.

Last added articles

Book Review: Archaeology and Crafts edited by Rüdiger Kelm

Arati Deshpande-Mukherjee (IN) and
Doug Meyer (USA)
The book “Archaeology and Crafts” is a transcript of the proceedings of the VI OpenArch-Conference held in Albersdorf, Germany, on the 23-27 September 2013. The conference was an activity of the OpenArch project –a cooperation of Archaeological Open-Air Museums across Europe of which the AOZA...

Paleofestival: 10 years of spreading archaeology in evolution

Edoardo Ratti and
Donatella Alessi (IT)
At the age of thirty Edoardo started to study Archaeology for pleasure at the University of Genoa (Italy) while working as a computer programmer. Since then has taken part in archaeological excavations of prehistoric sites. Here he met many enthusiastic students, who dreamed of a future as prehistoric archaeologists in Italy, a country much more structured for classical archaeology...

Archaeological routes and paths in northeast Slovenia – new opportunities for tourism

Nataša Kolar (SI)
Archaeological parks, routes and paths in Slovenia are becoming new cultural-tourist products/attractions which, due to their content, enable visitors to “travel” back to the most remote periods of time. These products/attractions were first created in order to preserve the archaeological heritage and to make visitors aware of the rich cultural heritage which can be found at a specific place.

The Value of Experience: Lessons from a Study of Reenactment

Samantha Hartford (UK)
It is no secret that in many ways experimental archaeology overlaps with what has come to be called experiential archaeology, an interpretive and humanistic approach to the past. As a result of drawing distinct lines between the two, experimental archaeology struggles with its conception of itself, and experiential archaeology is poorly studied.

Diagenesis in Modern, Danish, Burned Pig Bone

Anne Juul Jensen (DK)
During archaeological excavations, burned bones are often found as a result of cremation, cooking or accidental fire. Even though the bones are burned, their elemental composition might still hold information about diet, habitat and health history in the past.

The Role of Saltmarsh Plants in Iron Age and Roman Salt Production in the Thames Estuary, UK

Edward Biddulph (UK)
Analysis of plant remains and soils collected during excavations of the Iron Age and Roman Period salt production site at Stanford Wharf Nature Reserve on the coast of Essex have shown that saltmarsh plants and adhering sediments had been used as fuel to evaporate brine and crystallise the sea salt.

Problems and Suggested Solutions in the Replication and Operation of a Glass Furnace based on Roman Remains: An Experiment in Glass Production

E. Lauermann,
G. Putzgruber and
D. Götzinger (AT)
Experimental archaeology is taking on an ever more important role in pre- and early historical research. The archaeological open-air museum at the exhibition at the Museum of Pre- and Early History in Asparn/Zaya was a centre and teaching site for experimental archaeology from its beginnings in 1970.

Playing with the Past? Or Saving Our Future?

Luke Winter (UK)
As the manager of the Ancient Technology Centre (ATC) in Dorset, England, like many of you, I consider regularly what it is that we actually do. What services do we provide? How are we regarded by the public, by the education sector, by the children we teach, and by those who pay to come through our doors.

Review: The Great Human Race by National Geographic

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)
National Geographic offers some of the most beautiful film material, of nature and culture, one can imagine. When I heard that Dr Bill Schindler would co-star together with Cat Bigney in a series recreating humankind’s ancestral journey, I was thrilled...

Book Review: Recent publications: Experimental archaeology in the November 2015 issue of the Cambridge Archaeological Journal (Volume 25, Issue 4)

Giovanna Fregni (UK)
In the last quarter of the 1900s, John Coles (1979) and Peter Reynolds (1999) introduced the subject of experimental archaeology, which has gained significant momentumin the past few years. The discipline has become essential for reconstructing past technologies, in addition to supporting archaeological theory.

Pages

© by: EXARC since 2001. All rights reserved