EXARC Journal - Latest Articles

Reaching Out to the Communities We are Here to Serve: Developments at the Scottish Crannog Centre

Frances Collinson (UK)
The Scottish Crannog Centre is a small open-air archaeology museum on Loch Tay in Perthshire. It originally operated as a visitor attraction, giving people a glimpse into life in the Early Iron Age through demonstrations of ancient skills and guided tours of a reconstructed crannog – loch dwelling – based on discoveries and excavations made by the Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology...

Book Review: Slow Tech by Peter Ginn

Jonny Crockett (UK)
Slow Tech by Peter Ginn is a guide for step-by-step experimental archaeology. It is more a manual than a text or reference book, clearly showing the chaîne opératoire for potential experiments to try at home. Each of the five chapters includes a brief introduction to the relevant topics, followed by a series of experiments with clear procedure instructions and lists of required equipment...

Book Review: Experimentelle Archäologie in Europa, Jahrbuch 2019

Stefanie Ulrich (UK)
Annual Proceedings of the EXAR Tagung
***It is the 18th issue of the periodical and includes 27 essays on experimental archaeology as well as an annual report (Jahresbericht, p. 321), an obituary for Sylvia Crumbach (p.325) and instructions for authors (Autorenrichtlinien, p. 326) of Experimentelle Archäologie in Europa on 328 pages...

Conference Review: Reconstructive & Experimental Archaeology Conference REARC 2019

Cameron Privette (US)
REARC Conferences
***The 9th annual Reconstructive and Experimental Archaeology Conference, hosted by the Center for Historic Preservation at the University of Mary Washington and George Washington’s Ferry Farm in Fredericksburg, Virginia, took place between October 25th and 26th...

Book Review: Interpreting the Environment at Museums and Historic Sites by Reid and Vali

V. M. Roberts (CA)

Interpreting the Environment at Museums and Historic Sites is a textbook and a call to action. In the midst of the Anthropocene, Debra A. Reid and David D. Vail argue, museums and conservation areas should attend to their environmental assets, tell environmental stories, and take an activist role in encouraging better stewardship.