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One of EXARCs most important assets is the EXARC JOURNAL, all open access. It has four peer-reviewed sections covering EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGICAL OPEN-AIR MUSEUM, ANCIENT TECHNOLOGY and INTERPRETATION.
The fifth section of the EXARC Journal is called MIXED MATTERS. It contains book reviews, reports from conferences and events, interviews with personalities from the world of experimental archaeology and portraits of archaeological open-air museums. This section will be regularly updated to bring you topical news.

Last added articles

The Role of Saltmarsh Plants in Iron Age and Roman Salt Production in the Thames Estuary, UK

Edward Biddulph (UK)
Analysis of plant remains and soils collected during excavations of the Iron Age and Roman Period salt production site at Stanford Wharf Nature Reserve on the coast of Essex have shown that saltmarsh plants and adhering sediments had been used as fuel to evaporate brine and crystallise the sea salt.

Problems and Suggested Solutions in the Replication and Operation of a Glass Furnace based on Roman Remains: An Experiment in Glass Production

E. Lauermann,
G. Putzgruber and
D. Götzinger (AT)
Experimental archaeology is taking on an ever more important role in pre- and early historical research. The archaeological open-air museum at the exhibition at the Museum of Pre- and Early History in Asparn/Zaya was a centre and teaching site for experimental archaeology from its beginnings in 1970.

Playing with the Past? Or Saving Our Future?

Luke Winter (UK)
As the manager of the Ancient Technology Centre (ATC) in Dorset, England, like many of you, I consider regularly what it is that we actually do. What services do we provide? How are we regarded by the public, by the education sector, by the children we teach, and by those who pay to come through our doors.

Review: The Great Human Race by National Geographic

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)
National Geographic offers some of the most beautiful film material, of nature and culture, one can imagine. When I heard that Dr Bill Schindler would co-star together with Cat Bigney in a series recreating humankind’s ancestral journey, I was thrilled...

Book Review: Recent publications: Experimental archaeology in the November 2015 issue of the Cambridge Archaeological Journal (Volume 25, Issue 4)

Giovanna Fregni (UK)
In the last quarter of the 1900s, John Coles (1979) and Peter Reynolds (1999) introduced the subject of experimental archaeology, which has gained significant momentumin the past few years. The discipline has become essential for reconstructing past technologies, in addition to supporting archaeological theory.

Book Review: Geschichtstheater. Formen der "Living history" by Wolfgang Hochbruck

Ibrahim Karabed (DE)
The dramatisation of history is ubiquitous in our postmodern everyday life: historical novels (as well as their TV adaptations, netting huge audience figures), documentaries, and stylistic references and citations evoking the past in fashion and architecture...

Book Review (German): From Rome to Las Vegas. Reconstructions of ancient Roman architecture by Anita Rieche

Wulf Hein (DE)
For more than 200 years ancient buildings have been reconstructed. Reasons for the reconstruction of Roman architecture in particular are many. People enjoy being surrounded by fully realised reconstructions of ancient ruins where they can be taught in a manner reflecting a museum-like academic rigour...

Needlework the Pazyryk Way?

Marja Haas (UK)
The relative rarity of textiles in the archaeological record makes this a fascinating area of research not least because the technology is well understood but also because, in many cases, little changed over time. Traditional methods of felting, spinning, weaving and sewing are commonplace activities undertaken by many amateurs and professionals worldwide...

Experiments on Possible Stone Age Glue Types

Werner Pfeifer and
Marco Claußen (DE)
These experiments cover the making and testing of several possible glue types that might have been used in the hunter and gatherer period of the European Stone Age (without the aid of ceramics). Glue types produced in these experiments are: 1. Birch bark tar and pitch, 2. Pine wood tar and pitch, 3. Pine resin / wax glue, 4. Pine resin / wax / charcoal glue, 5. Hide glue and 6. Blue Bell glue

Access to Cultural Heritage Sites for All

Linda Nilsen Ask (NO)
The purpose of Universal Design is to increase people’s opportunities to participate in society through the design of products, services, methods of communication, buildings and built-up spaces that are accessible to as many as possible. Many will suffer from some form of disability at some time in life, either temporarily or long-term...

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