EXARC Journal - Latest Articles

How to Communicate an Event to the Media

Martine Sarfati (FR)
In 2018 a very important event took place in Russia that had worldwide impact: the Football World Cup. I'm French and we won! But aside from patriotism, the craze for this extremely popular sport can be largely attributed to the media. Without them, such an event could not have achieved such a magnitude of success. The World Cup has been explored by the media from all angles: fashion, science...

Colonial Williamsburg: Archaeology, Interpretation & Phenomenology

Peter Inker (US)
2018 EXARC in Kernave
***When I began investigating this conference I was unclear as to how well EXARC’s focus on experimental archaeology would blend with International Museum Theatre Alliance (Imtal)’s approach of museum theatre and interpretation. They seem after all, two very different disciplines...

X-Ray Tomography and Infrared Spectrometry for the Analysis of Throwing Sticks & Boomerangs

Luc Bordes (FR)
Throwing sticks, including boomerangs as a subclass, are prehistoric objects as old as humanity. They have endured on many continents in different forms, uses, and traditions of manufacture. Numerous different approaches have been used to study them. Many studies of throwing sticks are dominated by morphological determination and focused on Australian objects which have been...

Spinning in Circles: the Production and Function of Upper Palaeolithic Rondelles

A. Needham,
A. Langley,
H. Benton,
S. Biggs,
J. Cousen,
A. Derry,
M. Hardman,
K. Macy,
D. Millar,
E. Murray,
F. Pock,
J. Rowsell,
M. Sandin Catacora,
G. Van Oordt,
D. Veitch-Scoggins and
A. Little (UK)
Rondelles are thin, circular disc cut-outs typically made from the blade of the scapula of medium sized ungulates, such as horse or cervid. These are primarily associated with the Late Upper Palaeolithic Magdalenian and focused around northwest Europe. Rondelles are frequently...

Yeoncheon Palaeolithic Festival: from Hand Axe to Street Dance

Eva IJsveld and
Dorothee Olthof (NL)
In 1978 a US Army soldier stationed in the North of South Korea discovered several hand axes near Jeongok in the Yeoncheon Province. This was the start of many years of archaeological investigations and eventually the building of the very futuristic Jeongok Prehistory Museum and the organisation of the annual Yeoncheon Paleolithic Festival...